cinephilearchive:

One of the longest dolly tracks in the history of movies for the “Mickey Mouse March” in Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Full Metal Jacket.’ [thanks to Will McCrabb]

Through interviews with Kubrick’s collaborators and cast members, including Vincent D’Onofrio, Lee Ermey and Adam Baldwin, this documentary reveals how Kubrick’s brilliant visual sense, astute knowledge of human nature, and unique perspective on the duality of man came together to make ‘Full Metal Jacket’ an unforgettable cinematic experience, taking its place in his “war trilogy” alongside cinematic landmarks ‘Fear and Desire’ and ‘Paths of Glory.’

Recommended reading, viewing, and listening:

“Stanley was, needless to say, very specific about this particular setup, as he was with all setups… So it’s all been pre-planned. Then he gives the finder to Lucien Ballard, and Lucien has watched him and says, ‘I see, it’s going to be a very nice shot.’ Lucien gets to work, Stanley walks off the set to do some piece of business. He comes back a few minutes later and Lucien has indeed set up the dolly track but he set it up at a considerable distance from where Stanley’s position had to be — in terms of the proximity to the set. Now Stanley said, ‘Wait a minute, Lucien, what are you doing, Lucien?’ ‘Well, I took your dolly shot and  instead of the 25mm, I’m just going for the 50mm, but I’m at a distance where you would get the same image size… it won’t make any difference.’ Well, it’s all the difference in the world. As soon as you back up, you can hold the same image size, but the entire perspective changes… Stanley looked up at Lucien Ballard and said, ‘Lucien, either you move that camera and put it where it has to be to use a 25mm or get off this set and never come back!’” —Alexander Singer

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E. Thompson

I make movies. Sometimes people see them. I have been a martial artist for a very long time. I'm in a personal war with the Oxford comma.

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